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Named Parameter Idiom

I came across another C++ idiom which is "useful if a function takes a large number of mostly default-able parameters". You can check it out here. It makes use of a fairly common technique called Method Chaining. I am thinking of putting together a list of C++ idioms, which are spread across web and also the idioms from popular books.

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oZZ said…
"I am thinking of putting together a list of C++ idioms, which are spread across web and also the idioms from popular books."

I would greatly appreciate such an effort!

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